Posts Tagged ‘ choice ’

Inhabiting In-Between Spaces

I’ve been exploring liminality and in-between spaces in a few posts. And while the structure is simple, and the ideas it offers are profound and meaningful, actual living in and transitioning through liminal spaces is often anything but clear, ordered or certain. There can be a great deal of fuzziness, frustration and even fear. I thought it would be helpful to explore what it’s like to actually live in the in-between spaces.



Principles Matter

Some of our hardest questions are hard simply because the situation is complex and the possible outcomes are fuzzy and abstract. Knowing how to make a good decision, and how to sustain one, is hard. But it doesn’t have to be. There is a way to be able to sort through the fuzziness and get to the heart of what matters.



We Are Fundamentally Predisposed To Ignore Context

Culture is important. And context is everything. And yet, when we make decisions, we very often ignore the things that we should pay attention to the most. Worse, our tendency to do that is hard wired. That doesn’t mean it has to stay that way, though.



Perseverance, Adaptability and Follow-through

When someone asks you what you do and where you are going, what do you answer? And is that answer an honest reflection of your dreams, or is there a hint of defensiveness behind it? It’s hard to reinvent ourselves, and it’s hard to make a change. There are times that it is necessary, but making that call involves careful personal judgement. In our journey through life, we persevere, we adapt and we follow-through where necessary.



The Lies We Tell Ourselves

Yes, “why” is a problematic question. And in asking it, we run the risk of being seen as part of the problem. That’s in large part because we often fear the answer. We don’t have to, and there are choices in how we respond. We just need to be willing to make them.



The Unbearable Madness of Being: Improvement Imperative

Why do we obsess about—and in fact embrace—notions of eternal busy-ness? That was the question that was raised in the first article in this series. One aspect that I outlined was the role that technology has played in providing constant access to near-ubiquitous information. This article continues those themes, exploring our eternal obsession with improvement.