Posts Tagged ‘ insight ’

So What?

We try to understand situations, analyze problems and offer solutions. We believe that they solutions will be understood on their own merits. That the general insights we offer will be translated into personal implications that people are prepared to embrace and run with. And we would be wrong. A meditation on the importance of two words.



Editing, Insight & Meaning

We are all editors. By that, I mean that throughout our lives we disclose—or don’t—material information. The challenge of editing in all aspects of life is a significant one. We choose what to leave in—and what to leave out—in many areas of our lives. Telling stories. Reporting findings. Presenting research. Writing reports. But how does…
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The Unbearable Madness Of Being: Our Risk Obsession

Look out! Be careful! That’s dangerous! Should you really be doing that?! Risk has become quite the four-letter-word. It is, in certain circles, the new fetish to obsess about. In corporate corridors, over boardroom tables and in workshops and meetings (especially in workshops and meetings) risk management is a topic of seemingly endless discussion.



The Power to Impact a Life

I had the privilege of seeing Clayton Christensen speak for the first time a couple of days ago. A professor of Business Administration at Harvard University, he is perhaps best known for his groundbreaking work in the field of innovation. In particular, he advanced the concept of disruptive innovation, of new entrants at the bottom…
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The Challenges Of Facilitation

Facilitating, when you do it well, is a challenge. It isn’t easy taking a group where they need to go, particularly when you aren’t certain where that really is, or the process that will get them there. You can plan, you can contemplate, you can design—in the end, however, it is just you and the…
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The Best Advice Ever

I read a really interesting blog post by Neil Gaiman today, in which he shares the best advice he ever received from another author. Actually he reveals two bits of advice, one to do with shaving and one that is non-shaving related.



Censored & Proud

The Russians understand the power of art. And, as we all know, power corrupts. The corruption of art is what led to the state-sanctioned control of all forms of art during the Soviet era. It led to the development of the underground art community, exemplified by the likes of Solzhenitsyn and Platonov. It is what raises…
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