Posts Tagged ‘ bias ’

“Best Practices” Aren’t Doing For You What You Think They Are

There is a subset of the population that is in love with the idea of “best practices.” It is incredibly appealing to believe that there is one right way of doing things. Simply calling something “best practice” is to implicitly make it unassailable. And yet how we think about best practices says a lot more about the person that it does about the practice.



We Are Fundamentally Predisposed To Ignore Context

Culture is important. And context is everything. And yet, when we make decisions, we very often ignore the things that we should pay attention to the most. Worse, our tendency to do that is hard wired. That doesn’t mean it has to stay that way, though.



Confidence vs. Competence

We have an enormous tendency to confuse confidence with competence. We want someone who can do the work, but we tend to trust the person that looks the part. Doing so is inherently dangerous, and points to some significant biases we may not even recognize.



Lies, Damn Lies and… Where are the Statistics?

A really interesting article caught my attention in the Globe & Mail on Monday, suggesting that your most engaged employees may also be your lowest performing employees. And your high performers may be feeling completely powerless. I can only imagine the legion of managers and supervisors that snorted their morning coffee or choked on their bagel as…
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